Dating you’ve been reading articles pots dating a vintage guitar, you may reading have come across mention of pot codes. The pots, or potentiometers to give their full name, are the variable resistors that control volume and tone. Better quality pots are often stamped with a number of codes; typically part numbers, date of production, pots codes and dating values. Many pots don’t carry example of this information, but the better quality guitars produced in America regularly do. Codes where are these codes? Normally they are stamped or inked onto the back or sides of the pot. So reading them will require opening control cavities, removing scratchplates, or in the case codes a semi acoustic, removing the pots entirely.

HOFNER POT CODES – FACT FILE

Copyright Kit Rae. The pots are what the knobs are mounted to, essentally manually adjustable resisitors that control the voltage across a circuit. The codes were created by the Electronic Industries Association EIA in s to identify the product source and date of manufacture.

The CTS pots have two numbers. The number beginning with is the date code. The scheme is yyww. Shown in the picture below is pot made between​.

Get some additional keys here. BURNY LPs with diagonal wire drilling wire comes out on the left hand corner of the neck pickup cavity are built from to around probably Tokai factory. Fujigen used drilling where the wire comes out of the right hand side of the neck pickup cavity or center wire drilling. E arly Terada guitars have center wire drilling.

That is different to the Tokai diagonal wiring channel design that goes through the Mahogany Body. Normal type. All LPCs feature 90 degree angle pointer washers so are from or later. Long 45 degree pointer washer. To be continued…. Your email address will not be published.

Potentiometer codes

Copyright , 20th Century Guitar Magazine. The strange and mysterious neck codes found on Fenders from — 80 have been all but ignored by the vintage and collectible guitar community. Perhaps this is due to the fact that s Fenders have, until recently, been all but ignored by the vintage and collectible guitar community. Now that these instruments are hitting the “magical” year mark, they have suddenly gained attention.

In , CBS-Fender began to implement a new type of neck stamp in place of the usual date stamp consisting of model code, month, year, neck width e.

There are many websites that detail date coding pots, speakers, and transformers​. If what follows doesn’t provide you with the date code information you need.

This page contains details about the Magnatone Custom Series amps. For an overview, see Magnatone Custom Series , or for a history of the Magnatone amps from , see The history of the Magnatone brand. Serial Numbers are located on the back panel and are listed with the Model. I haven’t have been able to find any concrete information regarding serial numbers for these amps Though its not critical a critical aspect of the history of these amplifiers, the more we know about serial numbers, the more we can make guesses on production numbers.

Early Custom’s were build without the interlock switches, although the interlock was on the schematic inside the amp. The metal part of the handle had a bare metal finish on early models, and soon there after they started to paint them black. Also, the badge plates were different on the very early Customs, eventually they were produced with the large “M” below right. It is possible that the first models had yet a different plate than the style of the early M7 plate below.

This rather cheesey acrylic badge was used on some Customs. The Why? Besides this very early M4, I’ve seen it used on other early Customs as well as some Silver Customs. There are many websites that detail date coding pots, speakers, and transformers. If what follows doesn’t provide you with the date code information you need, hit google and you’ll likely have your date code issues solved in no time.

Properly Dating a Fender Bass

I pulled this information from Google’s cache of the site. If anyone feels this page should be taken down, please feel free to contact me. Ampegs can be divided into six distinct groups for dating purposes: pre, to mid, early to , to , to , and post Each group uses a unique serialization scheme that can be used to assist in dating the amps, but in many cases, it is the features and characteristics of the amps that determine the year of manufacture.

Electronic Industries Association EIA codes can also be very useful for giving clues as to an amp’s age. These codes can be found on speakers, transformers, pots, capacitors, and multi-section electrolytic “can” caps.

Vox AC Potentiometer Date Codes. The potentiometers in Vox ACs, as in many other Vox models, were made by “Egen Electric Limited”.

With guitars in mind, dating if the last two digits of the source-date code are greater than 52, you’re not looking at the source-date code! Also it’s worth mentioning:. Stackpole for example converted from three to four digit date codes in late. On 3 digit date codes, you date to “guess” the decade guitars the pot or speaker. Codes this isn’t too difficult.

Date used by Fender. Codes pots on the left and right are Stackpole pots manufacture. Note the different position of the markings, even on pots from the same maker. The source-date code on a speaker. In this case, the speaker is made by Rola in the 9th week of. The decade, though not here shown by the source-date pot, was easily determined because this particular amp was only made during the s.

Note pot font guitars of guitars source-date code number always seems to be the same, for all speaker manufacturers.

Potentiometer Codes On Gibson Bass Guitars

Email: billy guitars. On the inside of your vintage Fender amplifier there is a paper chart with the tube locations for that particular model. On the tube chart there will be a rubber ink stamp with two letters.

I will also mention briefly pot-codes as a resource (numbers on the internal potentiometers of the guitar). These can definitely be useful in cases.

Zachary R. Fjestad is a freelance writer who specializes in guitars and amplifiers including the history behind them and their current value. Fjestad has been evaluating and appraising guitars for over 20 years. For more information, email Zachary at zacharyfjestad hotmail. Guitars Bass Amps Pedals Players. I read on a Gibson forum that, on seven-digit pot codes, the fourth and fifth numbers represent the date. Can you tell me what model this is and how much it is worth today?

Dating Gibson guitars is not easy—thank you! Lower Right: The fourth and fifth numbers of this seven-digit potentiometer date code reveal the last two digits of its year of manufacture. There are two basic components to your Les Paul question: dating it and identifying it. I get several questions about Gibson serial numbers every day, and my initial answer is always to not expect or rely on the serial number alone to determine the year of manufacture. In fact, without any other information about the guitar, the serial number is essentially worthless.

Dating A ’70s Les Paul

So, you can’t afford that ’54 Strat, or that ’64, or even that ’74 for that matter. Your last chance to own a vintage Fender Stratocaster is with the guitars of the late ‘s. You spot a ’79 in a local shop, or online, but how can you be certain it is a ’79? Some dealers simply go by the serial number, which you will discover can be far from accurate. Some might go by the pot codes, but those could have been stock a year or more old by the time they were put into the newly finished guitar. Or perhaps the guitar was even assembled by various parts picked up over the years and is being passed off as “All original”.

As for dating pots, you are correct that the fourth and fifth numbers of the potentiometer date code indicate the last two digits of the year (that is, the.

So you need to figure out the year of production for your Fender guitar or bass. You’re not alone. Fenders rank as the most frequently bought and sold instruments on Reverb , and finding a precise date of manufacture can be key to determining the value and specifics of an instrument. The most important thing to keep in mind when dating a Fender is the highly modular nature of the designs. Like Henry Ford, part of Leo Fender’s genius was in optimizing the company’s production efficiency.

His guitars were built en masse by an entire factory, not a single luthier toiling over one instrument at a time. Features like bolt-on necks and pickups wired into the pickguard all helped the Fender factory churn out guitar after guitar, day after day.

Tokai Forum – a subsidiary of

If you’ve been reading articles about dating a vintage guitar, you may well have come across mention of pot codes, and the concept of using pot codes to date your guitar. The pots, or potentiometers to give their full name, are the variable resistors that control volume and tone. Better quality pots are often stamped with a number of codes; typically part numbers, date of production, manufacturers codes and resistance values. Many pots don’t carry all of this information, but the better quality guitars produced in America regularly do.

So where are these codes? Normally they are stamped or inked onto the back or sides of the pot.

IRC used () code to begin the sequence of numbers on the pot case. Central Lab used ()and CTS used () codes. The way to ready.

Gibson bass guitars Part descriptions for Gibson bass guitars Potentiometers. Just like the basses themselves, the potentiometers the volume and tone dials have certain codes stamped into them that can provide useful information. These are an invaluable tool for dating vintage Gibson Instruments. The Gibson serial number system can be very difficult to interpret to say the least – whilst the pot codes had a simple system in which the date of manufacture was encoded into the numbers stamped into the casing.

Usually on the back, as shown in the picture here, or sometimes on the side. CTS codes are in the format year-week. So in the example pictured would indicate a CTS pot, manufactured in the 19th week of Gibson did use pots by other manufacturers, but less often – one such manufacturer is Centralab, code , which appears on a lot of early 60s guitar pots. For example a Centralab pot with code would indicate a production date of the second week of The other number on the pot is the Gibson part number.

When dating an instrument using pot codes, it is important to remember that pots can be changed, or fitted way after they themselves were made, so any conclusion must be in line with other features, such as hardware and serial numbers. In general, models which sold well and therefore had a high turnover of components have the best correlation between pot date and guitar date. In these cases all pots are often from the same batch, with identical codes.

For example something like an EB0 which sold in it’s thousands will typically have pots produced contemporaneously with the guitar, especially during the s and early 70s.

Potentiometer Codes

The back and sides were made of laminated flamed maple with a solid spruce top. Later the top was changed to laminated spruce. The fret board was made from Brazilian or Indian rosewood and had 20 frets the models had 21 frets. The finish consisted of nitro-cellulose lacquer.

1 Meg Potentiometer. The first three digits are the manufacturer’s code. The last three digits are the date code. The fourth digit is the year of manufacture and the​.

Since I primarily collect amps by Fender, and guitars by Gibson, Fender, Martin, National, Epiphone, Gretsch and Rickenbacker, I really can’t help them with these other less popular brands. As you have probably noticed, there is plenty of information here to help date the brands that I am interested in. But where does that leave everyone else? Well I’m not one to leave you out in the informational cold, so here’s something that I use quite often in dating amplifiers and electric guitars.

It’s called the “source-date code”, and it can help determine the approximate age of an electric instrument by the date its components were manufactured. Source-Date Codes On American made vintage gear, the pots and speakers provide an excellent opportunity to date a piece of equipment by referencing their “source-date code”. The source-date code found on pots and speakers gives the manufacturer and date roughly when the components were made.

It may have been some time before the part was installed at the factory, but it still provides a good approximation of when the gear was made. The source-date code will signify the earliest possible date that the instrument or amp could have been made. This isn’t going to be exact, but it will give you a “ball-park” age.

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